Have a good idea?

Posted on 4th March, 2013

Have a good idea and then ask the experts...or not.

 

This is perhaps the biggest dilemma for any creative, entrepreneur or inventor.  We know we've got a great idea. We believe in the potential.  It's a dead cert winner.  So now we want some advice as to the best way to make it materialise.

 

So we ask for advice.  There are a few options open.  Firstly there are the friends, family and fools option.  This is safe if you want positive reinforcement for your idea.  None of your friends or family are going to rubbish your idea for they do not want to upset you.  The fools simply don't understand it!

 

Then there are the experts.  The people we know who's opinion we can trust.  These may be the people who know better than us...or at least they ought to.

 

This is where the problem lies.  Time and again the experts have proved themselves wrong.  Take a look at these:

"So we went to Atari and said, 'we've got this amazing thing, even built with some of your parts and what do you think about funding us? Or we'll give it to you. We just want to do it. Pay our salary, we'll come work for you.' They said 'No'. Then we went to Hewlett-Packard; they said, 'We don't need you. You haven't got through college yet'." (Apple Computer founder Steve Jobs on attempts to get Atari and HP interested in his and Steve Wozniak's personal computer.)  

 

From the other computer camp:

"640K of memory ought to be enough for anybody." (Bill Gates of Microsoft, 1981.)

 

And of course the classic from the music industry:

"We don't like their sound, and guitar music is on the way out." (Decca Recording Company rejecting the Beatles, 1962.) 

 

So what are we supposed to do?  Ask people who are going to be nice and tell us what we want to hear? Get an expert opinion in the knowledge they may or may not be right?  Or listen to advice and then trust our instinct to guide us in the right direction?  Trusting instinct may never be advocated in Business School but quite often it is the more accurate feedback we could ever hope to have.

 

Have fun!

Ian

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